HomeMARY, OUR MOTHERFREE LOW COST RECIPESPRODUCE CHARTMARY'S HOMESTEAD HANDBOOKS, NUMBER ONEMARY'S HOMESTEAD HANDBOOKS, NUMBER TWOMARY'S HOMESTEAD PLANTING GUIDEHARVEST AND STORAGEMARY'S HOMESTEAD HANDBOOKS, NUMBER THREECHEESEMAKINGHEIRLOOM SEEDSFREE RECIPES OF MUFFINS/QUICKBREADS.MAIN DISH RECIPESMARY'S HOMESTEAD FREE SALSA RECIPESFREE RECIPES, TIPS NUMBER ONE.FREE RECIPES, TIPS # TWOCOOKINGBAKED GOODSGRAINSTOMATOESBIOINTENSIVE GARDENINGSWEET BASIL PLANTBEAN RECIPESMY PYRAMIDPREPAREDNESS FOR DISASTERSSUBSTITUTIONSFREE RECIPES, TIPS # 3FREE RECIPES, TIPS, # 4FREE RECIPES,TIPS, #5-HOW TO MAKE TORTILLASFREE RECIPES, TIPS # 6, ITALIAN FOOD RECIPESFREE RECIPES, TIPS # 7, HOLIDAY RECIPESMARY'S free low cost recipes # 2 SOUPS, STEWS & GUMBOSFREE LOW COST RECIPES # 3, SOUPS, STEWS, GUMBOSPRESERVINGPRESERVING # TWOPRESERVING # 3FREE GUIDE TO HOME CANNINGFREE GUIDE TO HOME FREEZINGFREE GUIDE TO DRYING FOODSPICKLES, RELISHES, JAMS, JELLIESHERBSDEHYDRATINGFRENCH INTENSIVE GARDENINGHOMESTEADINGURBAN HOMESTEADERS WITH SMALL SPACESHISTORIC GEORGETOWNCHILDREN'S PAGECHILDREN'S PHOTO PAGELINK PAGE NUMBER ONETHE MOST HOLY ROSARYOUR LADY OF MEDJUGORJECHAPLET OF DIVINE MERCYOUR LADY OF FATIMAOUR LADY OF ALL NATIONSCHRISTMASCHILDREN'S CHRISTMAS PAGEEASTERSCRIPTURE PAGEAbout UsMARY'S HOMESTEAD MISSIONContact Us
herb2.jpg
flower03.gif

 

MARY'S HOMESTEAD

GUIDE

FOR

GROWING & USING

VEGETABLES , FRUITS

& HERBS

redrose.gif

 

 

 

PLEASE ALSO VISIT MARY'S HOMESTEAD

PLANTING GUIDE. WE TELL YOU THE SUCCESSFUL

WAY TO GARDEN.

CLICK ON: PLANTING GUIDE

imagesCORN.jpg



COMMON VEGETABLES SAVED FOR SEED

MONOCOTYLEDONEAE

POACEAE ( GRASS FAMILY)

SWEET CORN

Homegrown sweet corn has a especially sweet flavor. The best way to enjoy it is to eat it as soon as it is picked, before  the sugar has turned into starch. The crop needs lots of sun and is wind-pollinated, so grow it in blocks , rather than rows, to aid pollination.

aspaeagus.jpg



LILIACEAE (LILY FAMILY)

ASPARAGUS

 (ASPARAGUS OFFICINALIS) PERENNIAL. DIOECIOUS ( MALE AND FEMALE PLANTS. POLLINATED BY INSECTS.

This crop requires a lot of patience. Asparagus can not be harvested for 3 years, or one more if the roots are planted. Female plants produce red berries, which should be gathered in the fall befor the first frost. For small quantities, put the berries in a clothe bag, then crush them by stepping on the bag . Put the mass of seed-pulp into a pail or bowl of water and wash it. The pulp and unwanted light seeds will float to the top and should be discarded. The seeds at the bottom are saved. Dry the seeds for about 3 days by spreading them out and turning them over occasionally, then store them.

lk103.jpg

 

 

LEEK

ALLIUM AMPELOPRASUM, PORRUM GROUP.

Pollinated by bees. Seeds form in the second year.

Plants are cultivated as for harvesting the first year. Even in northern climates the plants do not have to be stored but may be left in the ground. The second year, the individual plants will send up single stalks four to five feet high, each capped with an enormous ball.( it is an umbel, and has hundreds of flowers). Pick the umbels in the fall, and dry them well. The seeds are contained in capsules, and brisk rubbing of the heads is needed to extract the seeds.

ONION ( ALIUM CEPA ). BIENNIAL. POLLINATED BY BEES. SOAL-BLACK SEED FORMS IN THE  SECOND YEAR.

To insure the purity of variety, onions must be isolated from  other varities in the 2nd year of growth by a distance of a quarter mile. However, the gardener does not need to worry about onions being grown for eating  the 1st year), since cross-pollination can only occur between flowering plants.




 

beets.jpg



CHENOPODIACEAE ( GOOSEFOOT FAMILY)

BEET

This summer vegetable can also be stored for winter. The leaves can also be eaten and they can be grown in the house or a greenhouse for eating in the winter. In the winter you would need a sunny window in a cool place for the beet leaves.

The beet produces the rosette of leaves  the first year, but the second year produces a seed stalk  several  feet high. This has branches, along which tiny blossoms appear, followed by the the beet seed, actually seed balls containing enough seeds to produce up to 6 plants.

imagesswisschard.jpg



SWISS CHARD ( BETA VULGARIS, CICLA GROUP).

The stems of this broad-leaved vegetable ,  can be eaten cooked,  as well as the leaves can be eaten just like lettuce.
These vegetables have perfect flowers ( having both male and female parts)cross pollinated , by the wind.
Swiss chard and beets are vey similar, except the swiss chard is grown for its foliage, while the beets are grown for their roots and, increasingly, for the immature plant, from which both roots and foliage are eaten.

cabbage.jpg

 

 

BRASSICACEAE ( CABBAGE FAMILY )

It is possible to harvest cabbage throughout the entire year in some climates and if the correct varieties are sown and transplanted at the correct time. Cabbage gives you a large amount of produce for the amount of space.
There are savoy and red cabbage , green cabbage, purple cabbage,  and chinese cabbage.

imagesJACOBSCATTLE.jpg




FABACEAE, BEAN FAMILY

JACOB'S CATTLE BEANS

An old time bean from the New England states. These beans have long been the bean to use  for baking & soups. It can be used as a snap bean.

POLE BEANS

This popular summer vegetable has attractive flowers and foliage and is suitable for growing in a border.
Our favorite is Old Homestead (Kentucky Wonder Pole bean. This bean goes back to 1897. It is a pole bean with 6' to 8' pods that are very tender when cooked & have a great flavor.

LIMA BEANS
Commonly known as " butter beans". These seeds need warm and conditions to germinate, and can only grown successfully in warm climates.
Lima beans are a good bean  for your food  storage. You can make Lima Beans & Ham,  & many other other low cost meals.

tomatoonvine.jpg



SOLANACEAE  ( NIGHTSHADE FAMILY)

TOMATO

The nightshade family are fruiting crops, although these crops are technically fruits. The seeds  of these plants encase a fleshy pulp. They are usually classified as vegetables because we eat them as such.

The tomato is a versatile vegetable. Tomatoes are considered the most important crop. Anyone can grow a tomato in a pot or on a patio.The various forms include plum, salad,  large beefsteak, cherry and yellow tomatoes.

Our favorites are: beefsteak, roma , red fig, riesentraube, and cherokee purple.

The tomato is a must for Italian or Mexican meals.

imageGRENPEPPER.jpg



SWEET PEPPER

The sweet pepper is available on  an  assortment of bright colors. The red peppers are just like green peppers left to ripen  on the plant longer. They have a sweeter taste.

imagesrockyford.jpg



CUCURBIT ( GOURD OR CUCUMBER FAMILY)

MELON

Melons require plenty of water & new faster-maturing varieties are grown under cloches or in the open in a warm area. The heavy fruits, which are juicy and sweet-flavored, can be supported by nets as they mature. Melons have to be mostly eaten fresh as they do not store. I have tried some recipes for melon relishes but they are the best eaten fresh.

cicumber.jpg


 
CUCUMBERS

Cucumbers require a well manured soil. They can be grown in the greenhouse or outside.  The cucumber seeds we like are: White Wonder, Lemon Cuke, Parisian Pickle , & Marketmore.