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BUCKLEY BROTHER'S OLD TIME STORE

SILVER PLUME, COLORADO

THIS IS JERRIE'S FAMILY GROCERY STORE.

THIS IS LOCATED IN THE ROCKY MOUNTAINS

IN COLORADO. THIS IS WHERE SHE GOT HER

LOVE OF OLD TIME SKILLS.

IT WAS IMPORTANT NOW AND IT WILL BE

IN THE FUTURE !




 

 

 

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GARDEN TIPS AND PRESERVING RECIPES
FOR COOL CROPS.
In Missouri the harvesting time of beets is just around the 1st week in  June. If you live in other places call your loval extension agent.

DIRECTIONS TO PLANT BEETS

Sow successive crops all season, starting 2-4 weeks before last frost in the spring, and continuing until a month before first frost in the fall. (sowings in intense mid-summer heat may not germinate satisfactorily), sow where the plants are to grow 1/2 inch deep, 4-6 inches apart, in full sun or a neutral non acid-soil. Is necessary to thin gradualy, the thinnings can be enjoyed as greens. Keep soil evenly moist.When mature, lift and store in the refrigerator or root cellar. late crops can be left in the ground, mulched deeply in some climates and used right through the winter months.

 HARVESTING AND STORING BEETS

Beets are a root crop. Begin harvesting when beets are 1 inch in diameter or smaller for baby beets. Main harvest is when the beets are 2-3 inches. Tender tops make excellent greens regardless of the size of the root ball. Harvest spring-planted  beets before hot weather, (July). Harvest fall beets before the first moderate freeze. For storage, wash roots, trim tops to 1/2 inch, place in perforated plastic bags and store in refrigerator, cold moist cellar or pit. Storage life is 2-4 months.

CANNING BEETS



SELECTING, PREPARING AND CANNING BEETS, BEETS-WHOLE, CUBED OR SLICED.

QUALITY: For each 7-quart canner load, you will need an average of 21 pounds of fresh beets  (without tops), for each 9-pint canner load, you will need an average of 13-1/2 pounds of fresh beets. A bushel of beets(without the tops)weigh 52 pounds and yields 15 quarts to 20 quarts quarts.

Beets with a diameter of 1 inch to 2 inches are preferred. Beets larger than 3 inches in diameter are often fibrous and tough.

PROCEDURE: Trim off beet tops; leave 1 inch of stem and root to reduce bleeding of color. Scrub well. Cover with boiling water. Boil until skins slice easily, about 15 minutes to 25 minutes depending on size. Cool just enough to remove skins. Trim off stems and roots. Leave baby roots whole. Cut medium or large beets into 1/3 inch cubes or slices. Halve or quarterlarge slices. Add 1 tablespoon canning salt per quart to each jar if preferred. Fill jars with hot beets and fresh, hot water. Leave 1 inch of headspace. Adjust lids, and process.

In Missouri process pints 30 minutes at 10 pounds pressure in a steam-pressure canner.
DRYING BEETS
To dry vegetables select garden-fresh, top-quality produce for the best results. All vegetables require some preparation, such as removing stems, peels or seeds, before drying. Unlike fruits, I cut vegetables slightly smaller to hasten the drying time. Vegetables lose flavor and tenderness if the drying time is prolonged. A temperature of  125 F is recommended for most vegetables.  The finished vegetables should contain about 5 % moisture. When tested, vegetables should look and feel crisp or brittle.
Vegetables can be eaten dried , but they are usually reconstituted before using.  Vegetables can be crumbled into soups or stews.


TO DRY BEETS

Choose any variety with deep-red color and smooth skins. Wash, remove all but one inch of stem and tap root. Steam about 30 minutes or until tender. Cool; peel; cut into 1/2 inch slices or dice. Dry at 124F until leathery. Use in soups or reconstitute as a vegetable.






 

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DRYING BEETS

Wash whole beets and cut off the tops , leaving 1-inch on the leaves part. Cook in water until the skins just slip off the beet. Cook the beets in a saucepan for 30-35 minutes. You may cook them in a pressure cooker for 10-15 minutes. The pressure cooker saves energy.  After cooking the beets, chop, or  grate them.

I dry  them in a dehydrator. Here is the directions for how I dry them. Spread beets over the trays. I  dry them at around 120F.  until they are hard, about 8 to 10 hours for the slices, 
4-6 hours for chopped and grated beets. Turn the slices occasionally during drying and rotate trays at least once.

WAYS TO USE THE COOKED BEETS

I mostly use my dried beets in stews, soups and gumbo.  You do not have to soak them when you use them in hot stews, soups or a gumbo. If you want to use the dried beets as a cooked vegetable I suggest cooking the beets in boiling water for 30-40 minutes. Dried beets double in size when you serve them.

We grow beets in the house (in a plant room) in the winter. Mostly we get the beet leaves in the house.  I cook the  fresh leaves and serve with vinegar and butter. When I get lots of leaves I just throw them into the dehydrator.  When you store dried foods be sure they are dry. The goal of drying foods is to remove the excess moisture, getting the water content down. Comparing with freezing , drying is less expensive and many people believe it is more nutritious.


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GEORGETOWN LOOP RAILROAD

Built in 1877 to haul silver ore, the Colorado Central Railroad also enjoyed popularity as a tourist attraction . The Devil's Gate high bridge, considered to be an engineering feat and this most famous element of the route allowed climbing trains to circle back over the lower track as the railroad rose from Georgetown to Silver Plume. The bridge was dismantled in 1939. During the 1970s, the resumed summer service over the rebuilt loop and 4.5 miles of track, the result of a restoration project cooridinated by the Colorado Historical Society. The society operates the railroad during the summer months. We thank Historic Georgetown for the use of this photo.

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DRYING CABBAGE

Select solid, good cabbage heads with fresh, green color. Remove the tough outer leaves and cut the heads  and cut into quarters, Then cut into strips lenthwise. Chill in cold water. Drain well and pat the cabbage dry.

DEHYDRATOR: Spread strips thinly over trays. Dry for 12-15 hours at 120 F.or until brittle. Every 3-4 hours , you may stir with the hands and rotate the trays. 

SUN: Spread slices thinly over the trays and place in the hot sun where there is good circulation. Dry for 2-3 days, or until crisp, stirring occasionally, and taking trays inside at night.

DRYING CARROTS

Select dry, young, tender carrots. Scrub with a vegetable brush and then scrape the carrots.  Chop in small pieces. Steam blanch for 3-4 minutes , drain. Chill in ice water, drain, and pat dry.

DEHYDRATOR:   I  Spread  the pieces   one layer deep over trays. Dry for 12-18 hours at `120F until tough and leathery with no moisture in the dried carrots.   Then I stir the  pieces of carrots and rotate the trays occasionally.

SUN:  Spread slices  in a thin layer over the trays. Place in a well ventilated area in the hot sun and dry for 2-3 days, stirring occasionally and taking the trays inside at night.  Dried carrots are leathery and very pliable.

 

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CANNING CARROTS, SLICED OR DICED

QUANTITY: 1  QUART JAR NEEDS 2  1/2-3 POUNDS OF CARROTS. ONE-HALF OF    THE ABOVE FOR A PINT JAR.
CARROTS NEED 16-20 QUARTS FOR A BUSHEL OF CARROTS. A BUSHEL OF CARROTS WEIGHS 50 POUNDS.

SELECT SMALL CARROTS, 1 TO 1-1/4 INCHES IN DIAMETER. LARGER CARROTS ARE OFTEN TOO  FIBROUS.

WASH, PEEL, AND REWASH CARROTS. SLICE OR DICE.

HOT PACK-COVER WITH BOWLING WATER; BRING TO BOIL AND SIMMER FOR 5 MINUTES. FILL HOT JARS, LEAVING 1-INCH OF HEADSPACE.

RAW PACK-FILL HOT JARS TIGHTLY WITH RAW CARROTS, LEAVING 1-INCH HEADSPACE.

ADD 1 TEASPOON OF SALT PER QUART TO THE JAR, IF DESIRED. ADD HOT COOKING LIQUID OR WATER, LEAVING 1-INCH HEADSPACE IF NEEDED. WIPE RIMS OF JARS WITH A DAMPENED CLEAN PAPER TOWEL. ADJUST LIDS AND PROCESS.

RECOMMENDED PROCESS TIME FOR CARROTS IN A STEAM-PRESSURE CANNER.

PROCESS PINTS 25 MIN , QUARTS 30M MIN  AT 10 POUNDS PRESSURE IN STEAM-PRESSURE CANNER. THIS IS THE MO TIMES , PLEASE CALL YOUR ENTENSION AGENT FOR YOUR CORRECT TIMES IN  YOUR AREA.